‘GIS some more (GAeConf20 Part 3)

The final day of #GAeConf20 caused my mind to blow on several ocassions. Corn-starch glaciers, twisty graphs, and more challenge from a radical geographer. It's been quite a ride. Thank you, Geographical Association! #geographyteacher

The #geographyteacher community (GAeConf20 Part 2)

Day two of @The_GA's #GAeConf20 - Not only do I share-on amazing practice and ideas from the #geographyteacher community, but also reflect on how vital such engagements are, especially in times like these.

Kicking it off online (GAeConf20 Part 1)

Today saw the kick-off of the Geographical Association's eConference 2020 - While all of us geographers are unable to gather together this time around - we certainly did in virtual spirit. Here's my quick review and thoughts of a successful first day.

The ‘Downward Spiral’ and the Coronavirus

How the coronavirus pandemic is causing a 'downward spiral' in local ecomonies and what we can do about it.

The Geography of the Coronavirus

The second ‘Geogramblings’ blog video takes at an event that is currently dominating the news and has everyone speculating - the 2019 Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19). As is typical with such events, the media is awash with news and updates - while here, I take a look at the issue from a geographical point of view.

Climate Attribution and the Australian Bushfires

#Climate Attribution & the #AustraliaBushfires - Can we blame #climatechange? Ft @BBCWorld's #DigitalPlanet, @ClimateSignals @CarbonBrief @Jennnnnn_x. Thx to @Weatherquest_uk for supporting my first video! Check it out 🙂

Geographical Decade Review: 2010-2019 (Part 2)

#GeographyTeacher #DecadeInReview 2010-19 (Pt 2) - Nos 5 to 1 in my top-ten run-down of noteworthy 'geographical' items of the past decade. Ft. @StrikeClimate @BirdgirlUK @BBCWorld #DigitalPlanet @Gapminder @MetOffice @ClimateSignals

Geographical Decade Review: 2010-2019 (Part 1)

It was the decade within which I started this blog, and followers of it have been welcomed to be privvy to my, very personal, journey that has taken place. I'll neither be reflecting on that nor just simply giving highlights of posts that I've made. So forget the run-down of the top pop-hits of the … Continue reading Geographical Decade Review: 2010-2019 (Part 1)

How to make a graph the talk of the town

With @COP25CL #COP25 in full swing, a throwback to an #NGSS workshop by one of the talented @exploratorium Teacher Institute staff back in 2018, demonstrating a range of strategies that makes CO2 graphical data a lively conversation piece. A very useful set of resources for teaching #climatechange.

Click on “View original post” to get the full breakdown and tutorial!

Geogramblings

In relation to my previous post, I wanted to focus on one of the Exploratorium Teacher Institute STEM NGSS Conference sessions in more detail as it is directly relevant to all UK GCSE Geography syllabuses. Also it was a pretty cool piece of professional development and worth sharing with folks back home!

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The ‘Trends and Correlation in Environmental Data’ session presented by Lori Lambertson ticks a lot of boxes: various topics about climate change and the carbon cycle; graphical and enquiry skills… Let me take you through it.


1. The ‘anchoring phenomenon’

IMG_1807Lori starts us off by stating that the basis of the session will be a graph that we will all be contributing too, calling this graph an ‘anchoring phenomenon’. Now this term was new to me (whether it’s new to my UK Science teaching colleagues, I don’t know!).

First it’s useful to define the term ‘science phenomena’…

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Antarctica Week

Did you know that this week is ‘Antarctica Week’? Here’s a post from two years ago that contains a fantastic ‘letter’ written by someone who works with the British Antarctic Survey (BAS). He’s also not a bad at taking a snap or two – so go ahead and click on the “View Original Post” link and enjoy reading his experiences and looking at some fabulous images in honour of Antarctica Week!

Geogramblings

In Part 2 I’ll talk a little about the scientific importance of studying the Arctic and Antarctic, and treat you to a ‘letter’ from a close friend of mine who is currently in Antarctica with British Antarctic Survey! (Part 1 here)…

As a human race we live in microcosms with microcosms. Individually we are very self-centered. While that gives us traits to be equally ashamed and proud about, it can narrow the focus.

Think what you know about the Arctic and Antarctica for example. How did you come about that knowledge? If it’s because you’ve seen either for yourself, you’re only 0.03% of the world’s population who has that first-hand experience (assumptions made, like every visit was a single individual in 2016-17). Last year (2016-17) the number of visitors to Antarctica was 44,202. So the vast majority of what we know, as the general public, comes from…

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